Hulu Games: Editors Best Bets

Take a whiff. Can you smell that?

It’s the musky aroma of competition, hanging thick in the air no matter how hard you try to avoid it. And while most of the world’s attention will be tuned in to the amateur action south of the equator, we’ll be laser focused on championing our favorite shows on Hulu in hopes of pushing them all the way to the title of Best Show of All Time.

Below, Hulu editors have made the case for which show they believe is the ultimate champion. But the decision truly lies with you, the viewers. Be sure to check the often to make sure your favorite title makes it through to the next round.

Happy Hulu Games!


Two words: Danger Zone. Follow up word: Boop! Need more? ‘Archer’ is so packed with biting original jokes and deep pop culture references (Archer’s Steve McQueen and Burt Reynolds obsessions, just to scratch the surface) that it’s without question this show about a gang of misfit spies will become an enduring classic. It also doesn’t hurt that it blurs time periods, keeping it fresh for any generation of viewer. — Raef Harrison, Editor

Broad City:
There is no show on TV more socially relevant than “Broad City:” two twentysomethings navigating through life in New York City (and the subway), making adult decisions about taxes, weed, and romance. With a fresh, no-boundaries approach to comedy, it’s no wonder why millennials, Amy Poehler, and frankly everyone else is obsessed with it. I mean, don’t we all envision ourselves cashing a check in a glitter helmet while throwing 8,000 dolla-dolla bills in the air to a Drake song? Yas, Kween, we do. In short, Abbi and Ilana are all of us – reason enough why this show is like nothing else on television, is breaking down barriers, and will go down in TV history as a classic. — Jessica Tardif, Editorial Coordinator

Rick and Morty:
There’s a pill-popping character named Mr. Poopybutthole that has the emotional range of Meryl Streep. This alone is testament to the fact that “Rick and Morty” is a show that’s rich with complex characters and deep back stories – and it’s only been on air for two seasons.

While relatively new compared to the rest of its bracket, it’s quickly reaching “Classic” status. It’s super bizarre, funny, and can seamlessly blend fart jokes with heart-tugging death scenes that have Mazzy Star playing in the background. It goes there, and it will go there for as long as it can. This brave show is Dan Harmon’s animated tour de force. Let’s reward it because we already know it’ll stand the test of time — in this timeline and beyond. — Sheila Dichoso, Senior Editor


I Love Lucy:
What other show transcends time, age, gender, and even language in the way “I Love Lucy” does? The pioneering sitcom first aired in 1951, and through six seasons of blunders and misadventures has continuously captured generations of fans all around the world. Beyond being the first sitcom to use the three-camera format in front of a live audience – and the first to feature an interracial couple (and as leads!) – “Lucy” has brought endless joy to viewers time and again, creating laughter-filled memories shared by millions. No “waaaaahs” about it – We Love Lucy.
Richard Ogawa, Editor

In olden days, there was a little something called “appointment television” and “Cheers” was the king of Thursday nights. With 270 episodes over 11 seasons, the show was a ratings juggernaut that managed to survive losing one of its main cast members, Shelley Long, halfway through its run without jumping the shark. The characters were so strong that the show spawned another long-running megahit, “Frasier.” Still not convinced it’s a classic? It’s been over 20 years since “Cheers” aired a new episode, and we’d bet your bar tab that George Wendt still can’t walk into a room without everyone shouting “Norm!” — Liz Brown, Trending Editor


The Twilight Zone:
It’s been over 50 years since its last episode aired, and yet “The Twilight Zone” refuses to leave the consciousness of sci-fi and fantasy lovers the world over. Nearly every show within those genres in the last half-century has drawn heavily from the themes of hope, fear, and the complexities of the human condition expertly crafted by creator Rod Serling (who wrote over 80 of the 150-plus episodes). Even more productions have simply paid homage to it. From the eerie theme music and brilliant, smoky introductions by Serling to the haunting images and bittersweet revelations – there is nothing before or since quite like it. To watch it truly was, and still is, to take a journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. — Jordan Plaut, Associate Editor

The X-Files:
Mythology, conspiracy, mystery –“The X Files” had it all, plus the hottest couple in the history of paranormal criminology to boot. FBI agents/alien chasers Fox Mulder and Dana Scully were a classic pairing of skeptic scientist, and dreamer who just wants to believe. The show may have taken place in the ’90s, but the show’s 2016 return made us want to be abducted all over again. The truth is out there, and it says “The X-Files” will stand the test of time. — Liz Brown, Trending Editor


It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia:
With the recent news of its renewal through Season 14, “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” is slated to tie “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet” as the longest running live-action comedy series ever. That’s right – the quirky sitcom that initially received mixed critical reviews is about to go down in the annals of TV history. From the humble origins of season one, to the addition of Danny DeVito as the infamous Frank Reynolds the next year, to the unforgettable performance of ‘The Nightman Cometh’ in season four, who would’ve thought “The Gang” from Philly would make it this far? — Will Brown, Editorial Intern


Dog whisperer (I talk to my dog a lot), TV fan, Editor at Hulu