Rumble In The Bronx Is 20 Years Old For American Audiences! Has It Aged Well?

(NOTE: Apologies for not publishing this around the time of the 20th Anniversary of the film. I thought I did publish it, but it seems my memory has gotten the best of me. Either way, I hope this brings you back to memory lane, if you’re old enough for that, anyway.)

The only way you wouldn’t know about Rumble In The Bronx, is because you weren’t born in the 80s or 90s. It’s either that, or you aren’t a Jackie Chan fan in the slightest. How you would be the latter is beyond me. Jackie Chan’s awesome, even today.

By the time you’re reading this article (As well as me posting it), the 20th Anniversary of Rumble In The Bronx being released in American theatres might have already happened. But that’s not to say you can’t reminisce about this film. All of us have something nostalgic to enjoy.

SPOILERS FOR THE FILM BEYOND THIS POINT! WATCH THE MOVIE FIRST AND COME BACK IF YOU DON’T WISH TO BE SPOILED! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!

With that in mind, I have one question: Did Rumble In The Bronx age well?

I think Chan's face says it all about that question.

I think Chan’s face says it all about that question.

I’ll just give the most basic answer I can give: Yes and no.

Rumble In The Bronx is the first Jackie Chan movie I saw as far as I’m aware. As such, I used to watch it a lot as a kid. And since I watched it at such a young age, plot didn’t necessarily mean much to me, as I’m sure it didn’t for all of you when you were children either. But I digress.

For those who’ve never seen the movie, the basic plot is that a man named Keung ends up getting in between a local gang, a secret crime syndicate and theft of valuable diamonds in New York City. It’s up to him, his martial art skills and whatever allies he gains along the way to put a stop to it.

The plot itself seems fairly basic, if not cut-and-dry. Though, when you watch the movie, you can tell the plot and its dialogue are pretty lacking. Add in the cheesiness of the 90s and you’ve got the film figured out.


But if you’re a Jackie Chan fan like I am, you know that the fight scenes not only make up for the plot and dialogue, but they definitely get a lot of laughs. The action is purposely badass and comedic at the same time. And it’s a blast to watch. Even now, the fight scenes are definitely where it’s at.

However, there are some comedic scenes that are so over the top and ridiculous that you just have to laugh. If you recall, there was a scene in which a bathroom unrealistically blows up, leaving the cashier of the supermarket in total shock. Even now, I find that moment hilarious.

Maybe one day, I’ll go and watch the original Cantonese version of the film (if I can find said version with English subtitles, that is), just to see how much of a different experience it is.

One of the few moments Jackie Chan can look intimidating.

One of the few moments Jackie Chan can look intimidating.

Rumble In The Bronx is apart of my childhood. I’ll always enjoy it in my heart, no matter how much I change. The cheesiness made the plot and dialogue easy to bear, the action was intense when it needed to be and funny when it wanted to lighten the mood.

While I wouldn’t put this movie as better than First Strike, I can definitely say that it was just as enjoyable years later.

What do you guys think? Did you watch Rumble In The Bronx? Do you like the film? And also, for those who have watched the original version of the film, how much different does it end up feeling, if anything? Let me know in the comments section below.

Anyway, that’s everything for today! I’ll catch you all later! Peace. Out! 😉

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